Haggis Alternatives for a Traditional Scottish Burns Supper

Gordon loves cooking and experimenting with food. He loves making fresh dishes, particularly with unusual or under-used ingredients.

Haggis is the traditional culinary centrepiece of any Burns Supper. On January 25th each year – ter Scotland and far beyond – haggis will be served with the customary tatties and neeps (potatoes and Swede turnip/rutabaga) spil part of a petite or large gathering to commemorate the anniversary of the Scottish Bard’s birth. What happens, however, when you don’t have access to haggis, or simply don’t like it? Does this mean that you can not organise or take part ter an authentic, Scottish Burns Supper? While many purists would undoubtedly say yes, the majority will hopefully agree that this is absolutely not the case and that a Burns Supper without haggis is indeed entirely possible.

The recipes and foodstuffs included on this pagina are all variations on genuinely Scottish dishes, which can be served spil an alternative to haggis at a Burns Supper and still permit the evening to proceed te an otherwise traditional style.

Traditional Scottish Steak Pie with Chips and Brussels Sprouts

Steak pie is a hugely popular foodstuff te Scotland. It is most often associated with Fresh Year (Hogmanay) but is widely eaten at all times of year, making it the flawless haggis substitute for a Burns Supper. It is comprised of stewing beef and listig sausages, which are firstly cooked and cooled before being topped with puff pastry and baked ter the oven.

Ingredients for Two Generous Servings

Вѕ lb stewing beef (diced)

Four beef verbinding sausages

Two pints boiling water

ВЅ lb puff pastry

Two large potatoes

Brussels sprouts (quantity spil required)

Hammered egg for glazing

Two tbsp vegetable oil

Salt and freshly ground black pepper

Waterput the vegetable oil te to a large stew pot and gently fever. Add the beef only to the pot (not the sausages at this stage) and season with salt and pepper. Stir the beef around with a wooden spoon to brown and seal evenly. This will take a few minutes. After that, pour te the boiling water and bring to a gentle simmer. Beef stock or gravy may be the more common inclusion te pies of this type but the water gives this pie an old world plainness and works very well. Maintain the simmer for one hour.

Albeit pricking sausages with a fork prior to frying them is not advisable, it is essential to do so before adding them to the stew after the initial hour. Simmer for a further fifteen minutes before turning off the warmth, covering and leaving to cool entirely. It is necessary to cool the meat before assembling the pie, otherwise the steam will spoil the pastry. If time is brief, attempt sitting the pan ter a duo of inches of cold water te your submerge to speed up the process.

Embark making your chips when the meat is set aside to cool. Peel and chop the potatoes and add them to a pot of cold water. Bring to a boil and simmer for five minutes. Drain through a colander and permit the chips to cool before adding them to a plastic container with a piemel and the fridge for half an hour. Patstelling them cautiously dry ter a clean tea towel and deep fry for five minutes. Drain on kitchen paper, cool and terugwedstrijd to the dried dish and the fridge.

Add the steak and sausage to a Ten” x 7″ pie dish, with enough stock to almost voorkant it. Roll out the pastry to approximately 11″ x 8″ on a floured surface and cautiously lay it on top of the dish, crimping around the edges. Glaze with hammered egg, make a “+” te the centre spil a steam vent and bake ter a preheated oven at 400F/200C for forty minutes.

Eliminate any dead leaves from the Brussels sprouts and add them to boiling, salted water for ten to twelve minutes. Give the chips a 2nd fry for five to six minutes until crisp and golden. Plate up your meal spil shown and serve instantly to your greedy guests.

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